Kimonophilia

x

National Gallery 

Collection

 

Thinking about the style and the colour of the vintage kimonos available for this installation, we chose 6 paintings from The National Gallery Collection to work with. Each painting depicts or embodies a different period of European culture and fashion. Click on the name of period to find out how we reconstructed narratives for each painting.

Kimonophilia

x

National Gallery 

Collection

Thinking about the style and the colour of the vintage kimonos available for this installation, we chose 6 paintings from The National Gallery Collection to work with. Each painting depicts or embodies a different period of European culture and fashion. Click on the name of period on the menu to find out how we reconstructed narratives for each painting.

Kimonophilia

x

National Gallery Collection

 

Thinking about the style and the colour of the vintage kimonos available for this installation, we chose 6 paintings from The National Gallery Collection to work with. Each painting depicts or embodies a different period of European culture and fashion. Click on the name of period on the top page to find out how we reconstructed narratives for each painting.

Kimono

and

The Red Cloak

Across time and space:
The story of St Martin’s red cloak retold.
Discover our unique version here.
(Coming soon. It is on its way!)

Kimono

and

The Red Cloak

Across time and space:
The story of St Martin’s red cloak retold. Discover our unique version here.(Coming soon. It is on its way!)

Kimono

and

The Red Cloak

Across time and space:
The story of St Martin’s red cloak retold.
Discover our unique version here.
(Coming soon. It is on its way!)

Kimonophilia

Kimonophilia is a not-for-profit art and social project which creates a platform for transcultural collaboration, research and events with a focus on the kimono. The project was born as a spin off event at the Japan Matsuri Festival 2012 in London. After two years of preparation and planning, it was launched as part of the festival this year with a site-specific, live, fashion installation on Trafalgar Square and in the courtyard of St Martin-in-the-Fields.
Kimonophilia makes it possible for everyone to enjoy cultural fusion and future transformation in kimono fashions.

Kimonophilia

Kimonophilia is a not-for-profit art and social project which creates a platform for transcultural collaboration, research and events with a focus on the kimono. The project was born as a spin off event at the Japan Matsuri Festival 2012 in London. After two years of preparation and planning, it was launched as part of the festival this year with a site-specific, live, fashion installation on Trafalgar Square and in the courtyard of St Martin-in-the-Fields.
Kimonophilia makes it possible for everyone to enjoy cultural fusion and future transformation in kimono fashions.

Kimonophilia

Kimonophilia is a not-for-profit art and social project which creates a platform for transcultural collaboration, research and events with a focus on the kimono. The project was born as a spin off event at the Japan Matsuri Festival 2012 in London. After two years of preparation and planning, it was launched as part of the festival this year with a site-specific, live, fashion installation on Trafalgar Square and in the courtyard of St Martin-in-the-Fields.
Kimonophilia makes it possible for everyone to enjoy cultural fusion and future transformation in kimono fashions.

 

 

Kimonophilia

 

 

 

Kimonophilia

 

 

Kimonophilia

Lucretia   The Renaissance Oiran
Source: Portrait of a Woman inspired by Lucretia by Lorenzo Lotto

 

This mysterious painting is full of imagination and has been interpreted in many ways: a woman posed as a faithful wife with strong attitude or dignity; a prostitute in a seductive manner; a tragic heroine of virtue. Historically the name ‘Lucretia’ suggests the same ambiguity.

 

We recreated the portrait in a Japanese cultural context, staging and reflecting many different attributes of the painting. This is our Lucretia, the Renaissance ‘Oiran’ dressed in a lavish vermillion kimono jacket.

 

‘Oiran’ were courtesans entertaining wealthy clients in the pleasure district during Japan’s Edo period between the 17th and 19th century. With gorgeous kimonos and an elaborated hairstyle, their fashion often set trends. Appearing in the artworks of masters such as Utamaro and Hokusai, they became celebrities.

Lucretia   The Renaissance Oiran
Source: Portrait of a Woman inspired by Lucretia
by Lorenzo Lotto

 

This mysterious painting has multiple connotations: a woman with strong attitude, a historical tragedy and a prostitute. Historically the name “Lucretia” suggests the same ambiguity.
We recreated the portrait in a Japanese cultural context, staging and reflecting many different attributes of the painting. This is our Lucretia, the Renaissance ‘Oiran’ dressed in a lavish vermillion kimono jacket. ‘Oiran’ were courtesans entertaining wealthy clients in the pleasure district during Japan’s Edo period between the 17th and 19th century. With gorgeous kimonos and an elaborated hairstyle, their fashion often set trends. Appearing in the artworks of masters such as Utamaro and Hokusai, they became celebrities.

Lucretia   The Renaissance Oiran
Source: Portrait of a Woman inspired by Lucretia by Lorenzo Lotto

 

This mysterious painting is full of imagination and has been interpreted in many ways: a woman posed as a faithful wife with strong attitude or dignity; a prostitute in a seductive manner; a tragic heroine of virtue. Historically the name ‘Lucretia’ suggests the same ambiguity.

 

We recreated the portrait in a Japanese cultural context, staging and reflecting many different attributes of the painting. This is our Lucretia, the Renaissance ‘Oiran’ dressed in a lavish vermillion kimono jacket.

 

‘Oiran’ were courtesans entertaining wealthy clients in the pleasure district during Japan’s Edo period between the 17th and 19th century. With gorgeous kimonos and an elaborated hairstyle, their fashion often set trends. Appearing in the artworks of masters such as Utamaro and Hokusai, they became celebrities.

Turner's Romantic Sunrise
Source: Ulysses deriding Polyphemus - Homer's Odyssey
by Joseph Mallord William Turner

 

Beautiful light radiating from a dramatic moment of sunrise captured in this painting gave birth to our Sun Goddess in kimono. We materialized this magical hour of sunrise and recreated the colour spectrum of early morning sky in the installation, just as Turner made it tangible in his painting. Embellished with Greek style accessories, our Sun Goddess has a new hybrid identity.

 

Point of information: ‘Nippon’, the other name for Japan, has, since ancient times, suggested a country where the sun rises.

Turner's Romantic Sunrise
Source: Ulysses deriding Polyphemus - Homer's Odyssey by J. M. William Turner

 

Beautiful light radiating from a dramatic moment of sunrise captured in this painting gave birth to our Sun Goddess in kimono. We materialized this magical hour of sunrise and recreated the colour spectrum of early morning sky in the installation, just as Turner made it tangible in his painting. Embellished with Greek style accessories, our Sun Goddess has a new hybrid identity.
Point of information : ‘Nippon’, the other name for Japan, has, since ancient times, suggested a country where the sun rises.

Turner's Romantic Sunrise
Source: Ulysses deriding Polyphemus - Homer's Odyssey by J.M.William Turner

 

Beautiful light radiating from a dramatic moment of sunrise captured in this painting gave birth to our Sun Goddess in kimono. We materialized this magical hour of sunrise and recreated the colour spectrum of early morning sky in the installation, just as Turner made it tangible in his painting. Embellished with Greek style accessories, our Sun Goddess has a new hybrid identity.

 

Point of information: ‘Nippon’, the other name for Japan, has, since ancient times, suggested a country where the sun rises.

  A la  Pompadour
Source: Madame de Pompadour at her Tambour Frame
by François-Hubert Drouais

 

Light, elegant, pastel-coloured, decorative with ribbons and lace, feminine, and sophisticated: these are key words of Rococo. Madame de Pompadour, the official chief mistress of King Louis XV, is known as a fashion leader of that period. She was indeed a fashion icon and the source of glamour of Rococo.

 

For our response to the painting we imagined how she would have worn the kimono, if she had access to one.

  A la  Pompadour
Source: Madame de Pompadour at her Tambour Frame by François-Hubert Drouais

 

Light, elegant, pastel-coloured, decorative with ribbons and lace, feminine, and sophisticated: these are key words of Rococo. Madame de Pompadour, the official chief mistress of King Louis XV, is known as a fashion leader of that period. She was indeed a fashion icon and the source of glamour of Rococo. For our response to the painting we imagined how she would have worn the kimono, if she had access to one.

  A la  Pompadour
Source: Madame de Pompadour at her Tambour Frame by François-Hubert Drouais

 

Light, elegant, pastel-coloured, decorative with ribbons and lace, feminine, and sophisticated: these are key words of Rococo. Madame de Pompadour, the official chief mistress of King Louis XV, is known as a fashion leader of that period. She was indeed a fashion icon and the source of glamour of Rococo.

 

For our response to the painting we imagined how she would have worn the kimono, if she had access to one.

The style  Namban
Source: Il Gentile Cavaliere by Giovanni Battista Moroni

 

The characteristic style of the late Renaissance depicted in the painting influenced Japanese art and fashion from the late 16th century to the early 17th century. Through Portuguese traders and European missionaries the style became known in Japan. The first cultural exchange between Japan and Europe gave rise to a fascinating cultural fusion that brought about Namban art.

 

We invite you to envisage the age when the aspiration for the new look drove the ruling elite and samurai to incorporate European materials such as ruff, velvet, hats, and trousers into kimonos.

The style  Namban
Source: Il Gentile Cavaliere
by Giovanni Battista Moroni

 

The characteristic style of the late Renaissance depicted in the painting influenced Japanese art and fashion from the late 16th century to the early 17th century. Through Portuguese traders and European missionaries the style became known in Japan. The first cultural exchange between Japan and Europe gave rise to a fascinating cultural fusion that brought about Namban art. We invite you to envisage the age when the aspiration for the new look drove the ruling elite and samurai to incorporate European materials such as ruff, velvet, hats, and trousers into kimonos.

The style  Namban
Source: Il Gentile Cavaliere by Giovanni Battista Moroni

 

The characteristic style of the late Renaissance depicted in the painting influenced Japanese art and fashion from the late 16th century to the early 17th century. Through Portuguese traders and European missionaries the style became known in Japan. The first cultural exchange between Japan and Europe gave rise to a fascinating cultural fusion that brought about Namban art.

 

We invite you to envisage the age when the aspiration for the new look drove the ruling elite and samurai to incorporate European materials such as ruff, velvet, hats, and trousers into kimonos.

Woman with a  Baroque Hat
Source: Le Chapeau de Paille by Peter Paul Rubens

 

Tall and broad hats with brims are key fashion items in Baroque style. It is an interesting historical fact that, back in the late 16th century, those hats were brought to Japan by Portuguese merchants who were the first Westerners arriving in the country. The hats became popular among leading Samurai lords and had great social influence. However, there are no known visual records of women wearing such hats at that time.

 

Inspired by Rubens’ painting, we created our own style to explore how Japanese women might have incorporated Baroque fashion elements in their kimono style.

Woman with a  Baroque Hat
Source: Le Chapeau de Paille
by Peter Paul Rubens

 

Tall and broad hats with brims are key fashion items in Baroque style. It is an interesting historical fact that, back in the late 16th century, those hats were brought to Japan by Portuguese merchants who were the first Westerners arriving in the country. The hats became popular among leading Samurai lords and had great social influence. However, there are no known visual records of women wearing such hats at that time.
Inspired by Rubens’ painting, we created our own style to explore how Japanese women might have incorporated Baroque fashion elements in their kimono style.

Woman with a  Baroque Hat
Source: Le Chapeau de Paille by Peter Paul Rubens

 

Tall and broad hats with brims are key fashion items in Baroque style. It is an interesting historical fact that, back in the late 16th century, those hats were brought to Japan by Portuguese merchants who were the first Westerners arriving in the country. The hats became popular among leading Samurai lords and had great social influence. However, there are no known visual records of women wearing such hats at that time.

 

Inspired by Rubens’ painting, we created our own style to explore how Japanese women might have incorporated Baroque fashion elements in their kimono style.

Live Installation

 

Live Installation

 Live Installation

Kimonophilia Project 2014

This project was made possible by a group of dedicated volunteers.

Director:
Yuca Ishizuka 

 

Co-Project Director:
Caterina Pacini

 

Special thanks to:
John Sean Curtin
Revd Katherine Hedderly 
Daniel Sandler 
Marlo Love
Stella Whalley
Brian Westbury

 

Kimono Sponsor:
Elizabeth Hitchins 

 

Supported by:
Japan Matsuri 2014

Photographers:
Enrico Garofalo, Mitchell Soliton

 

video camera:
Sean Chambers

 

Costume Tailoring:
Egle Bucioniene

 

Communication Advisors:
Haruko Sheridan, Dan Williams

 

Text on Kimono and The Red Cloak:
Heide Pöstges

 

Event Helpers:
Alfy El Mohamed, April Boyd

 

Web Design/Text/Photo Edit:
Yuca Ishizuka 

Models:
Jessica Evans/Lucretia
Lasharn Williams/Sunrise
Leonardo Patanè/Namban
Paige-Louise Davies/Baroque Hat
Ralitsa Kaloyanova/Pompadour

 

Stylists:
Caterina Pacini, Elizabeth Hitchins
Naomi Shiga, Yuca Ishizuka

 

Kimono Dressers:
Elizabeth Hitchin, Hisako Fukushige
Hong Luu, Saaya Sugimoto

 

Hair&Make-up artists:
Connie Alice, Georgia Matieup
Hannah Whyte, Juliet Turner
Katie Robinson

Director: Yuca Ishizuka 

 

Co-Project Director: Caterina Pacini

 

Models: Jessica Evans /Lucretia, Lasharn Williams /Sunrise, Leonardo Patanè /Namban, Paige-LouiseDavies /Baroque Hat, Ralitsa Kaloyanova /Pompadour

 

Kimono Stylists: Caterina Pacini, Elizabeth Hitchins, Naomi Shiga, Yuca Ishizuka

 

Kimono Dressers: Hisako Fukushige, Hong Luu, Saaya Sugimoto

 

Hair&Make-up artists: Connie Alice, Georgia Matieup, Hannah Whyte, Juliet Turner,
Katie Robinson

 

Photographers: Enrico Garofalo, Mitchell Soliton

 

video camera: Sean Chambers

 

Costume Tailoring: Egle Bucioniene

 

Communication Advisors: Haruko Sheridan,
Dan Williams

 

Event Helpers: Alfy El Mohamed, April Boyd

 

Text on Kimono and The Red Cloak: Heide Pöstges

 

Web Design/Text/Photo Edit:
Yuca Ishizuka 

 

Special thanks to: John Sean Curtin,
Revd Katherine Hedderly  Daniel Sandler ,
Marlo Love, Brian Westbury, Stella Whalley

 

Kimono Sponsor: Elizabeth Hitchins 

 

Supported by: Japan Matsuri 2014

Kimonophilia Project 2014

 

This project was made possible by a team of dedicated and hard working volunteers.

 

Director: Yuca Ishizuka 

 

Co-Project Director: Caterina Pacini

 

Models: Jessica Evans /Lucretia, Lasharn Williams /Sunrise, Leonardo Patanè /Namban, Paige-LouiseDavies /Baroque Hat, Ralitsa Kaloyanova /Pompadour

 

Stylists: Caterina Pacini, Elizabeth Hitchins, Naomi Shiga, Yuca Ishizuka

 

Kimono Dressers: Hisako Fukushige, Hong Luu, Saaya Sugimoto

 

Hair&Make-up artists: Connie Alice, Georgia Matieup, Hannah Whyte,
Juliet Turner, Katie Robinson

 

Costume Tailoring: Egle Bucioniene

 

Event Helpers: Alfy El Mohamed, April Boyd

 

Photographers: Enrico Garofalo, Mitchell Soliton

 

video camera: Sean Chambers

 

Communication Advisors: Haruko Sheridan, Dan Williams

 

Text on Kimono and The Red Cloak: Heide Pöstges

 

Web Design/Text/Photo Edit: Yuca Ishizuka 

 

Special thanks to: John Sean Curtin, Revd Katherine Hedderly  Daniel Sandler ,
Marlo Love, Brian Westbury, Stella Whalley

 

Kimono Sponsor: Elizabeth Hitchins 

 

Supported by: Japan Matsuri 2014

 

© 2017 Kimonophilia Project. All rights reserved.